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Q: When I went to fill my prescription refill, I was told that it was too early to fill I have some medication left but wanted to pick up my refill while I was in the store. Why is it not possible to get my refill?  

Q: I leave for vacation before my refill is due. What should I do?

Q: I have been hearing a lot about the ‘West Nile virus’ on the news. Can you tell me if I should be wearing a bug repellant each day? What other steps can I take to protect myself and my family this summer?  

 

Q: When I went to fill my prescription refill, I was told that it was too early to fill I have some medication left but wanted to pick up my refill while I was in the store. Why is it not possible to get my refill?  

Pharmacist reply.... 

There are two situations where you may be advised that your prescription is too early to fill "The first is where a prescription refill will not be paid for by your drug plan because it is deemed too early to fill. Drug plans will only pay for medications when you are within a few days of finishing your last prescription supply. The second situation is when the doctor has specified a time interval. Between prescription refills and the request for the refill is short of this interval.  In both these situations, it is assumed that your dosage has not changed. If you are taking more or less medication than your prescription states, you are advised to notify the pharmacy so that your prescription can be updated. The pharmacist can request the necessary change to your prescription by calling the doctor. Adjusting your prescription will ensure the interval between refills is correct and this will avoid confusion when ordering your refill.

 

Q: I leave for vacation before my refill is due. What should I do?

 

Pharmacist response....

This will depend on where you plan to go on vacation, type of medication and on your drug plan. If you plan to vacation in Ontario, when needed, simply take your medication bottle/package to a pharmacy close to where you are staying and they will transfer and fill your prescription refill. The remaining refills can be transferred back to our store so that you can continue obtaining your refills on your return home. It is important to check ahead of time if the medication can be transferred in this way, as there are some exceptions. For example, narcotic and controlled medications cannot be transferred between stores. In this case we would advise that you speak to your doctor and arrange a prescription to take with you if need be. Another group of drugs (benzodiazepines; e.g. Lorazepam, diazepam, temazepam etc.) can only be transferred once, so refills cannot be returned Back to the original pharmacy after transferring out. 

Most drug plans will allow for vacation supplies if you are planning to travel out of province or overseas. Some provinces are able to accept transfers of prescriptions from Ontario. At present, pharmacies within Ontario are unable to accept transfers from another province. This means that if you have a prescription with us and it is transferred to another province, the prescription cannot be transferred back and, therefore, the refills will be lost.

If you have plans to go on vacation, we can help by checking your medications ahead of your vacation and advise you on the best way to handle your prescription refills whilst away.

 

Q: I have been hearing a lot about the ‘West Nile virus’ on the news. Can you tell me if I should be wearing a bug repellant each day? What other steps can I take to protect myself and my family this summer?

 

Pharmacist reply....

‘West Nile virus’ is transmitted to people by mosquitoes who have fed off infected birds. Since infected birds have been identified in the Quinte area, it is advisable to take precautions to protect you and your family against mosquito bites. "This can be done by covering up and using an insect repellant for extra protection when out-side during the mosquitoes most active periods; from dusk to dawn. Light coloured clothing is recommended.

Long sleeved shirts or jackets and long pants tucked into socks will offer good protection against mosquitoes.

Bug sprays containing DEET are the best repellants against mosquitoes. Products may differ in their content of DEET and some are unsuitable for use in children. To select the best product for you and your family, come in and speak to our pharmacists. For tips on reducing the number of mosquitoes around your property, visit the Hastings and Prince Edward counties Health Unit web site at http://www.hpechu.on.ca  

 

 

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